How to Write a Winning Resume

A resume is your personal marketing document, designed to ‘sell’ your skills and abilities to a potential employer. Research suggests that readers scan resumes within about 20 seconds, so it’s important to show them at a glance why you’re the best fit. To write a winning resume, ensure it is:
Matched to the Job Description
Make the reader’s job easy by showing a clear match between your skills and the job requirements. Clearly demonstrate how you meet the key skills, experience and attributes the employer is looking for. Emphasize your most relevant strengths and eliminate details that are unrelated to the position. Use similar keywords in your resume to those used in the job description to create a link in the mind of the reader.
Focused on Achievements
Highlighting key responsibilities is important, but don’t list your daily workload. Your resume should focus on the unique accomplishments that make you stand out. Show how you contributed to the organization; did you save money or time, exceed targets, solve problems, improve processes, or attract new customers? Where possible, quantify how you added value with numbers, percentages or dollar amounts.
Compelling Reading
The tone of your resume should be enthusiastic, upbeat and professional. Put your strongest and most relevant points first, using action words such as ‘completed,’ ‘developed’ and ‘managed,’ and superlatives such as ‘first,’ ‘best’ and ‘highest.’ Presenting your accomplishments honestly but confidently using high impact words will help them stand out and make your resume more compelling.
Structured Correctly
Center your contact details at the top of your resume. Include your name, address, phone number and email address. Next, list the relevant education and training that you have undertaken, starting with your most recent studies. After this comes your career history in reverse chronological order. List your job title, the name of the employer, a short description of the company (if appropriate) and the dates you worked there. Then outline your key responsibilities, skills, and accomplishments for each role. End your resume by naming your references, or stating that they are available upon request.
Formatted Appropriately
Keep the layout of your resume simple with lots of white space, bullet information, and a plain, readable font. Two pages are usually sufficient, so choose clear, concise language. It’s a good idea to have it proofread by a family member or friend.

How to prepare for an Interview

Here are a few more do’s and don’ts for being at your best during a job interview

Job Interview Do’s:

Preparing for a job interview is essential to making a good impression. Employ these handy job interview techniques to win over your interviewer:

  • Plan to arrive on time or a few minutes early. Late arrival for a job interview is never excusable.
  • Greet the interviewer by their first name.
  • Wait until you are offered a chair before sitting. Sit upright and always look alert and interested. Be a good listener as well as a good talker. Smile!
  • Maintain eye contact.
  • Follow the interviewer’s leads but try to get them to describe the position and duties early in the interview so you can relate your background and skills to the position.
  • Make sure you convey your good points factually and sincerely. Keep in mind that you alone can sell yourself to an interviewer. Make them realise why they need you in their organisation.
  • Always conduct yourself as if you are determined to get the job. Never close the door on an opportunity. It is better to be free to choose from a number of jobs rather than only one.

Job Interview Don’ts:

  • Answer questions with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Share things about yourself relating to the position.
  • Lie. Always answer questions truthfully, frankly and as concisely as possible.
  • Ever make derogatory remarks about your present or former employers, colleagues or companies.
  • ‘Over-answer’ questions. The interviewer may steer the conversation into politics or economics. It is best to answer the questions honestly, saying no more than is necessary.
  • Let your discouragement show. If you get the impression the interview is not going well and you have already been rejected, don’t show discouragement or alarm. Occasionally an interviewer who is genuinely interested in you may seem to discourage you in order to test your reaction.
  • Ask about salary, bonuses or holidays at the first interview – unless you are positive the employer is interested in hiring you and raises the issue first. However, know your market value and be prepared to specify your required salary or range.

Watch Dragon ball super